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About This Item

 

Full Description

The widespread use of glassed-steel equipment in highly corrosive chemical processes has made it necessary to detect weak spots in the coating and repair them before catastrophic failure occurs in service. This test is intended to detect discontinuities and thin areas in a glass coating on metal to ensure that the coating is defect free and has sufficient thickness to withstand the prescribed service conditions. A test voltage may be selected at any desired value up to 20k V, thus making the test applicable to a wide range of thickness requirements. When, because of bubbles or defects, the thickness of glass at any spot is less than enough to withstand the applied voltage, a puncture results with an accompanying indication of a defect. Remedial action is then required to repair the defect before the equipment can be used for corrosive service. (When such defects are found before the equipment leaves the manufacturer's plant another application of glass can usually be applied and fired to become an integral part of the coating.)
 

Document History

  1. ASTM C385-58(2018)

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    Standard Test Method for Thermal Shock Resistance of Porcelain-Enameled Utensils

    • Most Recent
  2. ASTM C385-58(2014)


    Standard Test Method for Thermal Shock Resistance of Porcelain-Enameled Utensils

    • Historical Version
  3. ASTM C385-58(2009)


    Standard Test Method for Thermal Shock Resistance of Porcelain-Enameled Utensils

    • Historical Version
  4. ASTM C385-58(2004)e1


    Standard Test Method for Thermal Shock Resistance of Porcelain-Enameled Utensils

    • Historical Version
  5. ASTM C385-58(1998)


    Standard Test Method for Thermal Shock Resistance of Porcelain-Enameled Utensils

    • Historical Version